It’s Not Nice To Screw the Audience

I have been reading The New York Times since I was 12 years old (15 years ago).

Seriously, I don't think I have ever not had a subscription to the paper and I don't consider it Sunday without pasta and Sunday "gravy" on the stove and The New York Times in the house.

So you can imagine how upset I was -- a loyal, longtime reader -- to see The New York Times pull a Clear Channel on me.

You know the concept -- national radio instead of local.

The Times stuffed a white sheet of paper in the newspaper last week to tell me they were raising my subscription price again.

I'm sorry that The Times is having&hellip

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It’s Not Nice To Screw the Audience

I have been reading The New York Times since I was 12 years old (15 years ago).

Seriously, I don't think I have ever not had a subscription to the paper and I don't consider it Sunday without pasta and Sunday "gravy" on the stove and The New York Times in the house.

So you can imagine how upset I was -- a loyal, longtime reader -- to see The New York Times pull a Clear Channel on me.

You know the concept -- national radio instead of local.

The Times stuffed a white sheet of paper in the newspaper last week to tell me they were raising my subscription price again.

I'm sorry that The Times is having&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Radio’s Extra-Terrestrials

Radio is losing touch with its audience at an alarming pace.

I'm not just talking about the youth audience that radio all but ignored during the past 13 years of consolidation.

Even older folks -- yes, baby boomers who are trying new media and liking it.

Facebook, once the bastion of Millennials, is experiencing its greatest growth from over 30's.

Baby boomers are using Facebook to find old flames, high school and college buddies, friends lost while life was happening.

Twitter is engaging radio users -- not to learn what the next song is that radio stations are playing, but as a way to have immediate&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Radio’s Extra-Terrestrials

Radio is losing touch with its audience at an alarming pace.

I'm not just talking about the youth audience that radio all but ignored during the past 13 years of consolidation.

Even older folks -- yes, baby boomers who are trying new media and liking it.

Facebook, once the bastion of Millennials, is experiencing its greatest growth from over 30's.

Baby boomers are using Facebook to find old flames, high school and college buddies, friends lost while life was happening.

Twitter is engaging radio users -- not to learn what the next song is that radio stations are playing, but as a way to have immediate&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Radio’s Extra-Terrestrials

Radio is losing touch with its audience at an alarming pace.

I'm not just talking about the youth audience that radio all but ignored during the past 13 years of consolidation.

Even older folks -- yes, baby boomers who are trying new media and liking it.

Facebook, once the bastion of Millennials, is experiencing its greatest growth from over 30's.

Baby boomers are using Facebook to find old flames, high school and college buddies, friends lost while life was happening.

Twitter is engaging radio users -- not to learn what the next song is that radio stations are playing, but as a way to have immediate&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Radio in 5 Years

In the past, radio was the best and only way to get "immediate" or at least timely information about world news. There was no CNN. No email to communicate with loved ones. Radio was a lifeline.

Today, radio is defined by ...

Scaled down workforces.

"Local" programming from out of town -- out of state and across the nation.

"Local" news from regional newsrooms to save money.

"Local" decisions made by corporate officers somewhere else.

No Internet strategy.

No mobile content plan.

No fun. No focus. No future.

That's radio today as consolidators are changing the face of&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Radio in 5 Years

In the past, radio was the best and only way to get "immediate" or at least timely information about world news. There was no CNN. No email to communicate with loved ones. Radio was a lifeline.

Today, radio is defined by ...

Scaled down workforces.

"Local" programming from out of town -- out of state and across the nation.

"Local" news from regional newsrooms to save money.

"Local" decisions made by corporate officers somewhere else.

No Internet strategy.

No mobile content plan.

No fun. No focus. No future.

That's radio today as consolidators are changing the face of&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES