The Satellite Radio Outrage

Eighteen months after the Sirius/XM merger was announed, the FCC finally approved it.

The entire process was a joke -- and a not very funny one at that.

In a world where the Justice Department allows almost any two companies to merge, for some reason this merger was held to another standard. It was pure hypocrisy at best.

It's as if federal regulators, lawyers, lobby groups and traditional media executives fail to understand that it's over for all of them if they don't change. The next generation is calling the shots now -- like it or not. They have control of the delivery system -- the Internet -- so displays of&hellip

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The Hannity & Farid Radio Show

While you may be out there worrying about the future of the radio industry without a new generation coming up through the ranks, Consolidation's Founding Fathers have been working diligently on how to work their "magic" on network syndication.

Farid Suleman, Citadel's $11 million man, has found a way to re-sign a talk show host he needs on several of his stations without spending much money -- a bean counter's dream.

The deal with the devil is with Clear Channel's Premiere Radio Networks for Sean Hannity.

I asked my colleague Joe Benson to help me look inside the Hannity deal and you probably won't be surprised to&hellip

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The Hannity & Farid Radio Show

While you may be out there worrying about the future of the radio industry without a new generation coming up through the ranks, Consolidation's Founding Fathers have been working diligently on how to work their "magic" on network syndication.

Farid Suleman, Citadel's $11 million man, has found a way to re-sign a talk show host he needs on several of his stations without spending much money -- a bean counter's dream.

The deal with the devil is with Clear Channel's Premiere Radio Networks for Sean Hannity.

I asked my colleague Joe Benson to help me look inside the Hannity deal and you probably won't be surprised to&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Free Listeners

Twenty-one Los Angeles stations have a cume of over one million according to the Arbitron Portable People Meter.

By comparison the diary method reports ten.

Twenty one -- or ten?

Which would you choose?

Don't ask Bob Neil or his band of die-hard diary proponents. They want the People Meter -- their way -- perfect.

And on their timetable - which seems to some as never.

The radio industry is in the tank -- along with other advertising-related businesses. If someone could show you a way to report larger audiences just by improving the methodology, wouldn't you be interested?

You'd think so. But&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

Free Listeners

Twenty-one Los Angeles stations have a cume of over one million according to the Arbitron Portable People Meter.

By comparison the diary method reports ten.

Twenty one -- or ten?

Which would you choose?

Don't ask Bob Neil or his band of die-hard diary proponents. They want the People Meter -- their way -- perfect.

And on their timetable - which seems to some as never.

The radio industry is in the tank -- along with other advertising-related businesses. If someone could show you a way to report larger audiences just by improving the methodology, wouldn't you be interested?

You'd think so. But&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

WBT Radio vs. the Music Industry

I love this.

Greater Media's WBT in Charlotte is standing up to the record industry.

Ever cost-conscious these days, WBT has had it with spending $30,000 a year on royalty fees for one show -- "Boomer" Von Cannon's "Time Machine" oldies show.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sorry to see the show go. Maybe, for now, the show needs to go to a music station in town.

WBT, except for that show, a non-music station, is giving the first indication of what it could be like for the record industry if the labels succeed at winning repeal of radio's performance tax exemption.

A House subcommittee has approved a bill that&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES

WBT Radio vs. the Music Industry

I love this.

Greater Media's WBT in Charlotte is standing up to the record industry.

Ever cost-conscious these days, WBT has had it with spending $30,000 a year on royalty fees for one show -- "Boomer" Von Cannon's "Time Machine" oldies show.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sorry to see the show go. Maybe, for now, the show needs to go to a music station in town.

WBT, except for that show, a non-music station, is giving the first indication of what it could be like for the record industry if the labels succeed at winning repeal of radio's performance tax exemption.

A House subcommittee has approved a bill that&hellip

Read More  FREE SAMPLES